Skip to main content

2022 Academic Credit Courses

 

May 16-27, 2022

 

DHM 3423: Editorial Styling for Merchandising

Instructor: Cosette Joyner Armstrong, Ph.D. | Associate Professor, Design, Housing & Merchandise

 

Styling for Merchandisers - Doel Reed Center

The production of artful images and the editorial styling techniques that support this production. This course reviews the elements of editorial styling for fashion merchandising, including photography basics, focusing on image production for digital and print media. Students will learn on-location styling competences, including location scouting, working with natural light, and “roadside” photoshoot management. This course is a hands-on learning experience in which students are required to gather inspiration broadly, develop a concept for an editorial fashion photoshoot, create a detailed implementation plan, source garments, and work with a professional photographer to conduct their photoshoot on location. This particular version of the course will employ the aesthetics and historical references of New Mexico to produce an album cover and jacket insert for a rock’n’roll band. Pre-requisite: DHM 2423 or proven proficiency in Photoshop and InDesign. A subscription to the Adobe Creative Cloud is required.

 

  • Full Course Description

    This course reviews the elements of editorial styling, including photography basics. An emphasis is given to editorial styling for digital and print fashion merchandising applications. This particular version of the course will employ the aesthetics and historical references of New Mexico as well as on-location styling competences, including working with natural light, location scouting, and “roadside” photoshoot management. Course content includes an introduction to editorial styling, an understanding of various professional roles in this sector of the fashion industry, and standards for styling practice. This course will also utilize curriculum from Teach Rock, which provides a framework for drawing inspiration from music. Lesson plans include a variety of creative activities, including photography practice, mood and clothes board development, merchandising “sets” of clothing using unexpected inspiration sources, sourcing props and garments, and scouting photoshoot locations as well as image editing and retouching. Students will also learn how to prepare industry-appropriate documentation for styling shoots, including cheat sheets, call sheets, and a photoshoot choreography plan. Students will be required in this course to immerse themselves in New Mexican culture and aesthetics and catalog historical and aesthetic sources of inspiration as they explore Taos, NM. This inspiration will be used as a springboard for editorial conceptualization and storytelling for a rock album cover and insert. Learning goals of the course include fostering a deep conceptual process for editorial work, developing an authentic styling point of view and approach to visual storytelling, visual communication design, photoshoot scouting, and effective interaction with a photographer.

 

 

ENGL 4400/5210: Writing the Native City from New Mexico

Instructor: Lindsey Claire Smith, Ph.D. | Associate Professor, English

 

 

Headshot of Lindsey SmithFrom the Santa Fe Indian School to Indian Market to the Institute of American Indian Arts, Indigenous Oklahomans have been at the vanguard of arts cultures of northern New Mexico. Oklahoma writers in particular have a history of participation in the Santa Fe and Taos writers’ communities, revealing traces of Oklahoma’s historical and creative influence on northern New Mexico. In this course, we will study the New Mexico writings of Indigenous writers from Oklahoma, considering them in a critical framework that brings together the regional, the urban, and settler colonialism, as well as Indigenous Studies methodologies and the unique arts cultures that inform them.

 

 

 

  • Full Course Description

    From the Santa Fe Indian School to Indian Market to the Institute of American Indian Arts, Indigenous Oklahomans have been at the vanguard of arts cultures of northern New Mexico. Oklahoma writers in particular have a history of participation in the Santa Fe and Taos writers’ communities, revealing traces of Oklahoma’s historical and creative influence on northern New Mexico. In this course, we will study the New Mexico writings of Indigenous writers from Oklahoma, considering them in a critical framework that brings together the regional, the urban, and settler colonialism, as well as Indigenous Studies methodologies and the unique arts cultures that inform them. We will read and interpret Lynn Riggs’s under-studied Santa Fe poems and his avant garde film, “A Day in Santa Fe.” We will also read selections from Joy Harjo’s Crazy Brave memoir and her own New Mexico poems, considering how the avant garde scene of 1930s New Mexico segued into the hippiedom that Harjo describes. Finally, we will view Sterlin Harjo’s comedy video set at Indian Market, “I’m an Indian Too,” and his documentary about Native Arts, Love and Fury, introducing a discussion of how the pressures of gentrification and urban development are shaping New Mexico’s current arts scene.

 

July 5-15, 2022

 

ART 4800: Large Format Analog Photography / ART 4280: The View Camera

Instructor: Andy Mattern, MFA | Associate Professor, Art, Art History & Graphic Design

 

Two students using 4x5 view cameras

In this intensive 2-week creative photography course held at the Doel Reed Center in northern New Mexico, OSU students will explore the unique aesthetic and technical possibilities of the 4x5 view camera. This classic photographic tool requires deliberate control over all aspects of the image making process — working on a tripod, composing the image upside down on the ground glass, exposing a single piece of sheet film at a time.

 

  • Full Course Description

    In this intensive 2-week creative photography course held at the Doel Reed Center in northern New Mexico, OSU students will explore the unique aesthetic and technical possibilities of the 4x5 view camera. This classic photographic tool requires deliberate control over all aspects of the image making process — working on a tripod, composing the image upside down on the ground glass, exposing a single piece of sheet film at a time. Successful engagement with this methodology will lead to a deeper understanding of the medium, while providing a window into its rich history. Students will be provided a view camera, tripod, film, chemistry, and other necessary materials to process their images. Course time will include technical demonstrations, shooting exercises, lab time, field trips, discussion, and critique.

Back To Top
SVG directory not found.
MENUCLOSE